... For example, only five academic papers explicitly investigate HBB owner motivations (see Walker, 2003; Jurik, 1998; 2004; Mason et al., 2011; Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004) with three further contributions from practitioner papers (see Enterprise Nation, 2009; Dwelly et al., 2005; British Telecommunications, 2008). This may be because when considering motivations, the HBB has been likened to self-employment and small business, with Thompson et al. (2009) reporting for their all-female sample of business owner-operators that motivations are similar irrespective of business location. ...
Do you love woodworking? Even without a huge workshop, you can create some of the more popular crafts and sell them.  And like most things, your success in business isn’t necessarily related to how skilled you are as a woodworker. So if you can figure out which products consumers want and just create those, you could have a good business plan.  Etsy.com and farmers’ markets are a great place to start selling.
... In addition, flexibility is presented as a source of conflict that impedes growth ( Shelton 2006) that may even leads women not to pursue self-employment ( Greene et al. 2013). The quest for flexibility also means that women attach less value to business expansion ( Cliff 1998;Noseleit 2014), spend less time on their ventures ( Longstreth et al. 1987) and are pushed into working part-time from home ( Thompson et al. 2009). Although some studies contest the notion that the relationship between work and family must be a source of conflict ( Powell 2012, Özcan 2011;Marlow 1997), the implication persists that this is a "women's issue". ...
... As the present study results showed, most of participants (75 per cent of the women interviewed) aspired a higher growth level for their HBBs and had a strong motivation for expanding their businesses. This is consistent with the studies ofBreen (2010), Wynarczyk and Graham (2013) and Clark and Douglas (2014) that recognize women-owned HBBs as completely dedicated, ambitious and expanding and is contrary to the study ofThompson et al. (2009)that considers women-owned HBBs weak and with very limited motivation. Negative stereotypes about women in Iran which are usually fused with biased attitudes and behaviors, affect the attitude of women toward themselves and act as a mental barrier that stifles women's ambition and risk-taking propensity. ...

... The first group believes that women go for HBBs because they have no other alternatives. Therefore, as the house is used as a business location, the growth of their business has been limited; their activity is thoroughly made marginal, because less time is used for the business; its survival is even under question ( Thompson et al., 2009), but Breen and Karanasios (2010) believe that managerial qualifications and access to capital and marketing skills make women-owned HBBs grow. Of course, there are significant gender differences at work in HBBs ( Holmes et al., 1997). ...

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