... To illustrate, three empirical studies are described, though this is not exhaustive. First, Thompson et al. (2009) use Global Entrepreneurship Monitor data, basing their measurement of HBB on nascent and start-up activities in the home. Elsewhere, Felstead et al. (2000) base their study on the 1998 Labour Force Survey that explores those who work mainly, sometimes or partially at home (both employed and self-employed), thus not separating employment and self-employment status. ...

... As the present study results showed, most of participants (75 per cent of the women interviewed) aspired a higher growth level for their HBBs and had a strong motivation for expanding their businesses. This is consistent with the studies ofBreen (2010), Wynarczyk and Graham (2013) and Clark and Douglas (2014) that recognize women-owned HBBs as completely dedicated, ambitious and expanding and is contrary to the study ofThompson et al. (2009)that considers women-owned HBBs weak and with very limited motivation. Negative stereotypes about women in Iran which are usually fused with biased attitudes and behaviors, affect the attitude of women toward themselves and act as a mental barrier that stifles women's ambition and risk-taking propensity. ...
Facebook continues to expand and grow. Therefore businesses are spending more on Facebook ads. But here’s the problem: a lot of old school businesses don’t know what they’re doing when it comes to Facebook ads. Even newer companies don’t have the time it takes to learn the ins and outs so that they get the most return on their Facebook ads investment.
Lifestyle Entrepreneur: Although the idea of lifestyle entrepreneur isn't new, it's gained in popularity with the rise of technology, the Internet, and a global economy. A lifestyle entrepreneur is one that builds a business that incorporates their interests and passions, and sustains their life goals. Many in this category are referred to as digital nomads because they often have online businesses that allow them to travel. However travel isn't necessary to be lifestyle entrepreneur. The key factor in a lifestyle entrepreneur is that they do what they love, and/or the business supports their chosen lifestyle.

For example, Amazon affiliates can potentially rake in obscene amounts of commission dollars if they work at it. Simply sign up as an affiliate to sell a company’s products using your special referral link, and you can get a commission for each product sold without lifting a finger. Commission ranges from product to product and also goes up in stages according to how many products sales your clicks generate. The top commission tier is 8%. That adds up to some serious amounts of cash each month if you’re promoting products with that high rate of commission ( Home & Garden is one such product area with high commissions).

... Though female entrepreneurship in the informal sector concentrates around small size and low growth activities, it provides the opportunity to earn money which further strengthens women's economic status and ultimately women empowerment (Welter and Smallbone, 2008 ). Moreover, evidence shows that about half of females engaged in self-employment/microentrepreneurship take it as part-time activity and operated within home (Thompson et al. 2009) that provide them work flexibility to mitigate the household responsibilities (Duberley and Carrigan 2013 ). Thus selfemployment/micro-entrepreneurship in the non-farm informal sector may be portrayed in substituting such parttime employment (Georgellis and Wall 2005; Saridakis et al. 2014) and it can be possible to witness a reverse scenario that female may be more interested than male to engage in self-employment or micro-entrepreneurial activities in the female intensive sectors. ...

... To illustrate, three empirical studies are described, though this is not exhaustive. First, Thompson et al. (2009) use Global Entrepreneurship Monitor data, basing their measurement of HBB on nascent and start-up activities in the home. Elsewhere, Felstead et al. (2000) base their study on the 1998 Labour Force Survey that explores those who work mainly, sometimes or partially at home (both employed and self-employed), thus not separating employment and self-employment status. ...

Facebook and Twitter are still the top business networks, but businesses often tend to struggle with more visual platforms like Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr and Snapchat. All of these platforms have huge consumer audiences, but many businesses don't realize how big they really are, how effective they can be and how to make them work for their brand. If you have a background in social media marketing and a passion for photography, focusing your consulting business on one specific platform, like Instagram, can be a great way to make money while helping other businesses improve their content and achieve their business goals.
... Similar reports are found else- where: Stoner et al (1990) and Thompson et al (2009), for example, both focus exclusively on female-owned HBBs and find that the flexibility and autonomy associated with HBB ownership positively affects WLB. Control over time, and in some cases including reduced working hours, were other benefits identified by Thompson et al (2009). Alternatively, other research reports that HBBs are not a solution to WLB issues. ...
The internet is the great equalizer. In business specifically, it has leveled the playing field. Anyone can start a money-making online business—anyone with a computer, that is. But here’s the thing: virtually no technical experience is needed. Today there are plenty of tools you can use to build an online business that makes the technical work a lot easier than it was in the past.
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