... Meanwhile, researchers have reached different results on the growth of women's HBBs. Some studies have found these kinds of businesses weak and with very limited motivation and potential for growth (Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004; Thompson et al., 2009). Yet, most studies conducted on women's HBBs have proved that they are completely serious and are growing across all sectors (Breen, 2010; Breen and Karanasios, 2010; Wynarczyk and Graham, 2013;Clark and Douglas, 2014;Modarresi et al., 2016b). ...
... As the present study results showed, most of participants (75 per cent of the women interviewed) aspired a higher growth level for their HBBs and had a strong motivation for expanding their businesses. This is consistent with the studies ofBreen (2010), Wynarczyk and Graham (2013) and Clark and Douglas (2014) that recognize women-owned HBBs as completely dedicated, ambitious and expanding and is contrary to the study ofThompson et al. (2009)that considers women-owned HBBs weak and with very limited motivation. Negative stereotypes about women in Iran which are usually fused with biased attitudes and behaviors, affect the attitude of women toward themselves and act as a mental barrier that stifles women's ambition and risk-taking propensity. ...
Lifestyle Entrepreneur: Although the idea of lifestyle entrepreneur isn't new, it's gained in popularity with the rise of technology, the Internet, and a global economy. A lifestyle entrepreneur is one that builds a business that incorporates their interests and passions, and sustains their life goals. Many in this category are referred to as digital nomads because they often have online businesses that allow them to travel. However travel isn't necessary to be lifestyle entrepreneur. The key factor in a lifestyle entrepreneur is that they do what they love, and/or the business supports their chosen lifestyle.
Focus - It's easy in this fast paced, constant info-in-your-face world to get distracted. This is especially true for business start-ups that often get side-tracked by the shiny object syndrome (i.e. products and services that promise fast results), or bogged down in unimportant busy work. Successful entrepreneurs are focused on what will bring results.
... Knowledge-workers use the home as their work location (McDermott, 2005), despite it being often dismissed as limiting network and growth potential (Mason, 2010), with perceived gender links (Mirchandani, 1998(Mirchandani, , 1999), even for 'high-tech' ventures (Wynarczyk and Graham, 2013). Despite a dearth of empirical studies, and regular calls for theoretical develop- ments around this phenomenon (e.g., Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004;Mason et al., 2011;Thompson et al., 2009;Walker and Webster, 2004), home-based, self-employed workers are absent from 'most existing research and theory-building' (Reuschke, 2015, p. 6). We fill this gap by analysing home-based, knowledge-workers' virtual, mental and career mobility; those physical/corporeal restrictions counter-balancing their remote, online home-working autonomy (Fraser and Gold, 2001;Koehne et al., 2012); and the tensions overlooked by extant paradox theorizing ( Smith and Lewis, 2011). ...
The basic idea behind an online drop shipping business is that, as a small business owner, you don’t have to maintain a large inventory (or any inventory whatsoever) of products or handle any delivery to your customers. That eliminates the financial cost and risk of having a warehouse full of stuff you might not sell, and the hassle of arranging to send orders all over the country or the world. In fact, you don't have to manufacture or store any products at all.
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