The prospect of working from home has gained credibility over the years. Home offices can now compete with small commercial businesses and save on rent in the process. It may also be possible to tax deduct some of your home expenses while running a home based business.[2] Faxes, high speed internet connections, dedicated home telephone lines, and cell phones help to make a home-based business a reality. Earlier home businesses had been where families lived on the second floor of their house while converting the first floor into a store, where upon close of business they would secure the first floor and retire to the upper floors. This type of home business is still done in some rural areas. Many home businesses are started off in a much smaller capacity whilst the owner is still employed elsewhere, and then expanded once they are proven to be profitable.
If you have a great deal of business experience and knowledge, why not create a business that helps aspiring entrepreneurs find success? As a business consultant, you can use your skills to help new business owners get off to a good start and help experienced entrepreneurs keep up with demand. Your chances of success may be greater if you focus your strategy on a niche aspect of business consulting. You can start this process by following this 18-step checklist for becoming a small business consultant.

I’ve found that fear often stops aspiring consultants from starting a consulting business–or any business–and on my blog, I talk about how to overcome those fears. I also talk about practical, concrete things you can do to start and run a successful consulting business, along with tools, tips, tricks, and techniques for automating your business and keeping costs to a minimum. The info I give is applicable to most other types of businesses as well.
... In addition, flexibility is presented as a source of conflict that impedes growth ( Shelton 2006) that may even leads women not to pursue self-employment ( Greene et al. 2013). The quest for flexibility also means that women attach less value to business expansion ( Cliff 1998;Noseleit 2014), spend less time on their ventures ( Longstreth et al. 1987) and are pushed into working part-time from home ( Thompson et al. 2009). Although some studies contest the notion that the relationship between work and family must be a source of conflict ( Powell 2012, Özcan 2011;Marlow 1997), the implication persists that this is a "women's issue". ...
... Complementing Hypotheses 2a and 2b, we posit that societal institutional collectivism will be more negatively associated with the probability that individuals engage in self-employment on a full-time rather than a part-time basis. Part-time self-employment allows comparatively more time to be spent upon other activities, such as caring for the home and family (Burke et al., 2008;Thompson et al., 2009). This resonates with societal expectations to act according with the collec- tive's interest ( Bullough et al., 2017). ...

... Consistent with Brekke (2015) and Isaksen (2015), in the immediate aftermaths of conflict, the triple helix of chaos, unpredictable destruction of factor endowments and physical immobility does make the penurious environment even more resource-poor, diminishing the capabilities to engage in non-necessity-based economic activities and confining entrepreneurial individuals to path-continuation. Factors that were traditionally considered entrepreneurship enablers, such as education ( Thompson et al., 2009Thompson et al., , 2010), offer minimal additional advantage. However, contrary to our expectations, as entrepreneurial individuals immersed themselves into the new order, they recognised new entrepreneurial opportunities through renewing and creating new paths by efficiently reconfiguring the meagre resources towards new purposes. ...
Virtually every small business needs help running their day-to-day administrative tasks, but they may not particularly want to pay a full-time in-house employee to do it. Virtual assistants perform a variety of tasks that a traditional assistant or secretary would normally do, including making travel arrangements, paying bills, or managing expense reimbursements.
... Knowledge-workers use the home as their work location (McDermott, 2005), despite it being often dismissed as limiting network and growth potential (Mason, 2010), with perceived gender links (Mirchandani, 1998(Mirchandani, , 1999), even for 'high-tech' ventures (Wynarczyk and Graham, 2013). Despite a dearth of empirical studies, and regular calls for theoretical develop- ments around this phenomenon (e.g., Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004;Mason et al., 2011;Thompson et al., 2009;Walker and Webster, 2004), home-based, self-employed workers are absent from 'most existing research and theory-building' (Reuschke, 2015, p. 6). We fill this gap by analysing home-based, knowledge-workers' virtual, mental and career mobility; those physical/corporeal restrictions counter-balancing their remote, online home-working autonomy (Fraser and Gold, 2001;Koehne et al., 2012); and the tensions overlooked by extant paradox theorizing ( Smith and Lewis, 2011). ...
... Meanwhile, researchers have demonstrated different results on the growth of women's HBBs. Some studies have found these kinds of businesses weak and with a very limited motivation and potential for growth (Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004;Thompson et al., 2009), whereas other studies have proved that they are very dedicated and expanding in all sectors (Breen and Karanasios, 2010;Breen, 2010;Wynarczyk and Graham, 2013;Clark and Douglas, 2014). Motivations are among important gender differences in HBBs and while men often choose HBBs as a response to special life circumstances (e.g. ...
The problems were analyzed and confronted in two ways. In 1980 the National Alliance of Homebased Businesswomen was founded to combat the isolation expressed by the respondents as well as to fight the laws which made conducting their businesses difficult.[6][7][8][9] Then Women Working Home: The Homebased Guide and Directory by Marion Behr and Wendy Lazar was published.[10] It contained the stories of many women who ran home-based businesses throughout the country in many diverse fields, as well as information on business formation, conduct and compliance with the law. It sold 50,000 copies. During this time many national magazines wrote about these issues.[11][12][13][14][15] At the White House Conference on Small Business in 1986, one of the major resolutions was a recommendation favoring lifting restrictions on home-based business.[16]

The internet changes so fast that one year online equals about five years in the real world. But the principles of how to start and grow a successful online business haven't changed at all. If you're just starting a small business online, stick to this sequence. If you've been online awhile, do a quick review and see if there's a step you're neglecting, or never got around to doing in the first place. You can't go wrong with the basics.

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