... As the present study results showed, most of participants (75 per cent of the women interviewed) aspired a higher growth level for their HBBs and had a strong motivation for expanding their businesses. This is consistent with the studies ofBreen (2010), Wynarczyk and Graham (2013) and Clark and Douglas (2014) that recognize women-owned HBBs as completely dedicated, ambitious and expanding and is contrary to the study ofThompson et al. (2009)that considers women-owned HBBs weak and with very limited motivation. Negative stereotypes about women in Iran which are usually fused with biased attitudes and behaviors, affect the attitude of women toward themselves and act as a mental barrier that stifles women's ambition and risk-taking propensity. ...

... Women (with and without dependent children) of this business type are distributed fairly equally across urban and rural areas. It is striking that a higher proportion of these businesses than home-based businesses on average had increased their turnover in the previous two years, which contradicts the view that 'mumpreneur' businesses are of marginal relevance in terms of turnover and value added (Thompson et al. 2009). The second distinct group of business owners run the business from home because of their own illness or disability or care of an elderly or disabled person. ...
... To encourage full-time self-employment, which may be particularly relevant for stimulating economic growth (Sautet, 2013;Williams and McGuire, 2010), policy- makers should consider facilitating societal practices related to future orientation and discouraging societal practices related to uncertainty avoidance and institutional collectivism. However, these activities may be neither necessary nor appropriate to also stimulate self-employment activity on a part-time basis, which can be particularly suited to increasing welfare for specific groups of indi- viduals, such as homemakers ( Strohmeyer et al., 2006;Weber and Schaper, 2004) and home-based entrepreneurs ( Thompson et al., 2009;Vorley and Rodgers, 2012). Societal institutional collectivism and uncertainty avoidance are negatively associated with entrepreneurial activity; performance orientation practices are positively associated with entrepreneurial activity. ...
... As the present study results showed, most of participants (75 per cent of the women interviewed) aspired a higher growth level for their HBBs and had a strong motivation for expanding their businesses. This is consistent with the studies ofBreen (2010), Wynarczyk and Graham (2013) and Clark and Douglas (2014) that recognize women-owned HBBs as completely dedicated, ambitious and expanding and is contrary to the study ofThompson et al. (2009)that considers women-owned HBBs weak and with very limited motivation. Negative stereotypes about women in Iran which are usually fused with biased attitudes and behaviors, affect the attitude of women toward themselves and act as a mental barrier that stifles women's ambition and risk-taking propensity. ...

A home business (or "home-based business" or "HBB") is a small business that operates from the business owner's home office. In addition to location, home businesses are usually defined by having a very small number of employees, usually all immediate family of the business owner, in which case it is also a family business. Home businesses generally lack shop frontage, customer parking and street advertising signs. Such businesses are sometimes prohibited by residential zoning regulations.[1]


... In fact, some employees who work most of their time from home are paid low wages although there are also high earners among this group of workers (Felstead et al., 2002). For the self-employed, there is good evidence of the low earnings of homeworking women compared to self-employed women for whom most of the activity is performed outside of their homes, while no penalty of homeworking on earnings among self-employed men could be found (Simon and McDonald Way, 2015; see also Thompson et al., 2009). ...
Tutors are in high demand whether it’s online or offline. Therefore, if you’ve got a brain and like helping others use theirs, become an e-teacher to earn an extra income in your spare time. The only thing you require is to be proficient in your area of expertise and be willing to give up a few hours each week to help someone else. Sites like Tutor.com and TutorVista are places you can sign up with and build a good reputation over time as a coach. If you’re really good, you can conduct lectures, seminars, or webinars that are transmitted online. University and college students are always willing to pay money to gain access into highly-respected online webinars.
These pay-per-click ads appear on your blog. Every time somebody clicks on an ad (which is supposed to be about a subject related to your niche), you make a few cents or more. Small amounts each time, but it adds up. This is extremely hands-off. You just need to get a code from Google, place it on your website - and the ads will automatically appear on your blog. Google will only show ads that are relevant to your blog so it's a good experience for your visitors and maximizes the number of clicks you get, meaning more income.
Mobile applications are more popular than ever, with people willing to pay good money for ways to manage their lives from their smartphones. If you have a great new idea for an app and know how to code, you can run with it and create your app yourself. You can also become an app developer for businesses that need to create specific apps. Both options will require you to know the basic elements of software design and at least two common programming languages, such as SQL, JavaScript, PHP, Python, Ruby on Rails or iOS.  

Lifestyle Entrepreneur: Although the idea of lifestyle entrepreneur isn't new, it's gained in popularity with the rise of technology, the Internet, and a global economy. A lifestyle entrepreneur is one that builds a business that incorporates their interests and passions, and sustains their life goals. Many in this category are referred to as digital nomads because they often have online businesses that allow them to travel. However travel isn't necessary to be lifestyle entrepreneur. The key factor in a lifestyle entrepreneur is that they do what they love, and/or the business supports their chosen lifestyle.


Mobile applications are more popular than ever, with people willing to pay good money for ways to manage their lives from their smartphones. If you have a great new idea for an app and know how to code, you can run with it and create your app yourself. You can also become an app developer for businesses that need to create specific apps. Both options will require you to know the basic elements of software design and at least two common programming languages, such as SQL, JavaScript, PHP, Python, Ruby on Rails or iOS.  
Virtually every small business needs help running their day-to-day administrative tasks, but they may not particularly want to pay a full-time in-house employee to do it. Virtual assistants perform a variety of tasks that a traditional assistant or secretary would normally do, including making travel arrangements, paying bills, or managing expense reimbursements.
If you’re a website or blog owner, you can sell a portion of your page space to advertisers and earn money passively each time the ads are clicked on by your target audience or visitors to your website. While the actual placing of the ads is completely free, the earning capacity of cost-per-click (CPC) advertising is based on the level of traffic to your site and the cost per click and click-through rate, or CTR. The most popular way to earn money today through advertising clicks is through Google AdSense or similar advertisers.
I’ve found that fear often stops aspiring consultants from starting a consulting business–or any business–and on my blog, I talk about how to overcome those fears. I also talk about practical, concrete things you can do to start and run a successful consulting business, along with tools, tips, tricks, and techniques for automating your business and keeping costs to a minimum. The info I give is applicable to most other types of businesses as well.
I have a friend that is the city manager of a town of about 25,000 where his main task is processing requests for building permits. Actually a volunteer-type job, no salary. But he makes a bunch of contacts every day, and his address book is huge. So he is busy all year except the Holidays. To fill in this time he started a Christmas tree lighting service (houses, lawn ornaments, etc.). In this 3-month period he makes enough to keep him going the rest of the year.
... Though female entrepreneurship in the informal sector concentrates around small size and low growth activities, it provides the opportunity to earn money which further strengthens women's economic status and ultimately women empowerment (Welter and Smallbone, 2008 ). Moreover, evidence shows that about half of females engaged in self-employment/microentrepreneurship take it as part-time activity and operated within home (Thompson et al. 2009) that provide them work flexibility to mitigate the household responsibilities (Duberley and Carrigan 2013 ). Thus selfemployment/micro-entrepreneurship in the non-farm informal sector may be portrayed in substituting such parttime employment (Georgellis and Wall 2005; Saridakis et al. 2014) and it can be possible to witness a reverse scenario that female may be more interested than male to engage in self-employment or micro-entrepreneurial activities in the female intensive sectors. ...
I like these ideas! Besides being good ideas in themselves, they stimulate MORE ideas! Some of them reminded me of something I was reading about called Craigslist arbitrage – buying low and selling high on craigslist, kind of like the first part of the old Oregon Trail game, but with washers and dryers and bicycles instead of cases of crackers and horses. Sounds like fun!  Anyway, that one about the pooper-scooper business, that works, I know because I was quite successful in the pooper-scooper service I started back in 1988! I’ve been in the industry for 25 years now, though I don’t go out and scoop any more.
... Meanwhile, researchers have reached different results on the growth of women's HBBs. Some studies have found these kinds of businesses weak and with very limited motivation and potential for growth (Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004; Thompson et al., 2009). Yet, most studies conducted on women's HBBs have proved that they are completely serious and are growing across all sectors (Breen, 2010; Breen and Karanasios, 2010; Wynarczyk and Graham, 2013;Clark and Douglas, 2014;Modarresi et al., 2016b). ...

You know this one already. You include links to products you are promoting as an affiliate and every time somebody buys the product, you get a commission. With a blog, you can integrate advertising with content to make it even more likely you’ll get the sale. For example, you could do a product review—which is useful content—and then include a link to buy the product under an affiliate link.
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