Great ideas about a home based business. However, we all need to understand that most ONline and OFFline buisnesses fail about 90% of the time. Franchises seem to do some better but they have challenges too. Our goal is focused on building a PLAN B to help build financial security. After 32 years in the trenches as an entrepreneur, we invite you to visit our website, join us as a subscriber too where we share about our lumps and bruises in business owners.
... The first group believes that women go for HBBs because they have no other alternatives. Therefore, as the house is used as a business location, the growth of their business has been limited; their activity is thoroughly made marginal, because less time is used for the business; its survival is even under question ( Thompson et al., 2009), but Breen and Karanasios (2010) believe that managerial qualifications and access to capital and marketing skills make women-owned HBBs grow. Of course, there are significant gender differences at work in HBBs ( Holmes et al., 1997). ...

No matter which way you do it, it’s passive income—money you earn while you sleep because you put these products up for sale on your website and a customer can buy and download them any time of day or night, automatically. All you have to do is check the sales periodically to see what topics or types of products are selling best so you can make more of those.
... 'Lifestyle' HBB can be either 'growth-rejecting' or 'growth-enthusiastic' but Lewis (2008) argues that actually they should be seen as engaging in a 'freestyle' modus operandi as lifestyle is not something accommodated by the businesses but is rather a conditioning factor in the business operations. It appears from the research that HBB set up by women are more likely to be financially marginal as they are more likely to be operated parttime , and be started because of circumstances rather than their entrepreneurial skill sets (Thompson, Jones-Evans, & Kwong, 2009). Nevertheless HBB are a popular choice for women with family obligations as even with less financial success, role conflict between work and family tends to be lessened (Loscocco & SmithHunter, 2004). ...

Serial Entrepreneur: Many entrepreneurs get the most joy out of starting and building a business, but not in its continued management, so they sell it to launch a new idea. They are still considered entrepreneurs because they operate and assume risk in the business for the time they own it. Other times, serial entrepreneurs juggle several businesses at once, earning multiple streams of income.

Instead, you’ll be following a proven strategy for maximizing views of multiple videos on a regular basis. You’ll be creating useful content—something engaging that people want to watch. And it works in many, many different niches. It could be a how-to video or a talking-head video on a topic of interest for people in your niche—the sky is the limit.


... Home-based business are also said to have lower growth ambitions than other firms and are likely to have few or no employees (Thompson et al. 2009; Newbery & Bosworth 2010). There is much assertion throughout the limited literature that motivations for starting home-based bsuinesses are based on the flexibility they afford in terms of work-life balance (Baines & Gelder 2003; Thompson et al. 2009), including balancing work and domestic commitments, often cited as particularly suited to working mothers (Loscocco & Smith-Hunter 2004; Ekinsmyth 2011). Alternatively, Soldressen et al. (1998) and Newbery and Bosworth (2010) argue that low barriers to entry in terms of costs and resources are key motivators for home-based business. ...
... Entrepreneurship and location (ruralÀurban) Geographical location appears to be crucial in explaining entrepreneurship development. Empirical pieces of evidence show that higher competition, increase in population resulting higher population density, higher demand for goods and services, etc., result in higher entrepreneurship opportunities (Sorenson and Audia 2000; Reynolds et al. 2002; Shane 2003; Sternberg 2009). Studies found that the growth of entrepreneurship in the urban areas is much higher than that of rural areas (Shane 2003; Glaeser, Rosenthal, and Strange 2010). ...
... It would be desirable to explore more if handicraft producers could be grouped into a number of clusters or types of producer based on these three business characteristics. Previous literature on business transition led to proposition that the higher performing handicraft producers would be those exhibiting formal business activities in a dedicated premise (Thompson, Jones-Evans &Kwong, 2009; Roberts and Robinson, 2010). In addition, based on the key informant interviews conducted, according with Malaysian government policy the full-time workshop-based producers would be highest performing unlike part-time domestic producers, who it was expected would have weaker performance due to informal and improper management of their business activity. ...
... In terms of industry, there appears to be some 2 concentration in business services (Soldressen et al. 1998; Loscocco & Smith-Hunter 2004), and several studies find home-based firms are started with low levels of initial capitalisation (Loscocco & Smith-Hunter 2004; Thompson et al. 2009). Home-based business are also said to have lower growth ambitions than other firms and are likely to have few or no employees (Thompson et al. 2009; Newbery & Bosworth 2010). There is much assertion throughout the limited literature that motivations for starting home-based bsuinesses are based on the flexibility they afford in terms of work-life balance (Baines & Gelder 2003; Thompson et al. 2009), including balancing work and domestic commitments, often cited as particularly suited to working mothers (Loscocco & Smith-Hunter 2004; Ekinsmyth 2011). ...
... For example, only five academic papers explicitly investigate HBB owner motivations (see Walker, 2003; Jurik, 1998; 2004; Mason et al., 2011; Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004) with three further contributions from practitioner papers (see Enterprise Nation, 2009; Dwelly et al., 2005; British Telecommunications, 2008). This may be because when considering motivations, the HBB has been likened to self-employment and small business, with Thompson et al. (2009) reporting for their all-female sample of business owner-operators that motivations are similar irrespective of business location. ...

If you have the expertise or a passion or interest for a subject, you're ready to start making money with a blog. With a service like Blogger (www.blogger.com), you can start up your blog totally free. You can also create your own site and secure your own hosting for a low price, which is generally the route I recommend, as many free blogging sites have restrictions on what you can say or do, including making money or advertising.

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