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... Complementing Hypotheses 2a and 2b, we posit that societal institutional collectivism will be more negatively associated with the probability that individuals engage in self-employment on a full-time rather than a part-time basis. Part-time self-employment allows comparatively more time to be spent upon other activities, such as caring for the home and family (Burke et al., 2008;Thompson et al., 2009). This resonates with societal expectations to act according with the collec- tive's interest ( Bullough et al., 2017). ...
... For instance, some may resort to part-time rather than full-time self-employment to establish and run a social venture ( Austin et al., 2006;Korsgaard and Anderson, 2011). Others may favour this form of self-employment to jointly set up and operate a business with family members ( Baines and Wheelock, 1998;Fletcher, 2010), to work from home while caring for children and family (Thompson et al., 2009;Vorley and Rodgers, 2012) or to delay entry into full-time entrepreneurship (Folta et al., 2010). Although we recognised such arguments when portraying full-and part-time self-employment and developing our hypotheses, we leave it to future research to assess the relationship between societal culture and particular types of part-time entrepreneurship in more detail. ...

... The literature comes to very different conclusions with respect to the 'success' and growth ambitions of women HBB entrepreneurs. Some conclude that these businesses operate at the margins and struggle to survive (Thompson et al. 2009), while others found that home-based women owners were highly educated and made large sales (Loscocco and Smith-Hunter 2004). Home-based businesses are often regarded as 'lifestyle' businesses through which the owner translates a 'hobby' into a business idea (Newbery and Bosworth 2010). ...
... Knowledge-workers use the home as their work location (McDermott, 2005), despite it being often dismissed as limiting network and growth potential (Mason, 2010), with perceived gender links (Mirchandani, 1998(Mirchandani, , 1999), even for 'high-tech' ventures (Wynarczyk and Graham, 2013). Despite a dearth of empirical studies, and regular calls for theoretical develop- ments around this phenomenon (e.g., Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004;Mason et al., 2011;Thompson et al., 2009;Walker and Webster, 2004), home-based, self-employed workers are absent from 'most existing research and theory-building' (Reuschke, 2015, p. 6). We fill this gap by analysing home-based, knowledge-workers' virtual, mental and career mobility; those physical/corporeal restrictions counter-balancing their remote, online home-working autonomy (Fraser and Gold, 2001;Koehne et al., 2012); and the tensions overlooked by extant paradox theorizing ( Smith and Lewis, 2011). ...
... Consistent with Brekke (2015) and Isaksen (2015), in the immediate aftermaths of conflict, the triple helix of chaos, unpredictable destruction of factor endowments and physical immobility does make the penurious environment even more resource-poor, diminishing the capabilities to engage in non-necessity-based economic activities and confining entrepreneurial individuals to path-continuation. Factors that were traditionally considered entrepreneurship enablers, such as education ( Thompson et al., 2009Thompson et al., , 2010), offer minimal additional advantage. However, contrary to our expectations, as entrepreneurial individuals immersed themselves into the new order, they recognised new entrepreneurial opportunities through renewing and creating new paths by efficiently reconfiguring the meagre resources towards new purposes. ...
... Meanwhile, researchers have reached different results on the growth of women's HBBs. Some studies have found these kinds of businesses weak and with very limited motivation and potential for growth (Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004; Thompson et al., 2009). Yet, most studies conducted on women's HBBs have proved that they are completely serious and are growing across all sectors (Breen, 2010; Breen and Karanasios, 2010; Wynarczyk and Graham, 2013;Clark and Douglas, 2014;Modarresi et al., 2016b). ...
One of the most important internet marketing strategies is to develop every customer's lifetime value. At least 36 percent of people who have purchased from you once will buy from you again if you follow up with them. Closing that first sale is by far the most difficult part -- not to mention the most expensive. So use back-end selling and upselling to get them to buy again:
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